Last call for entries for Employee Art Show

Put the finishing touches on your masterpiece: There’s still time to register for the 17th annual “On My Own Time Employee Art Show” hosted at the Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center on South Campus. Registration is open through July 14.

UT Southwestern faculty, staff, and students are invited to submit their best artwork in a wide range of mediums: works on paper or canvas, black-and-white or color photography, enhanced photography/computer art, sculpture, ceramics, wood, glass, jewelry/metals, mixed media, textiles/fiber, corporate collaboration, sustainable art, and literary art.

Winning entries for each category will go to a regional exhibition at NorthPark Center.

For more information, visit the On My Own Time webpage.

Key dates

July 14 (Friday)

July 20-21 (Thursday and Friday)

  • Artists drop off artwork at the South Campus Library (E2)

July 24-28 (Monday through Friday)

  • Artwork installation for exhibit

July 31 (Monday)

  • OMOT art display official “Opening Date”

July 31-Sept. 19

  • UT Southwestern Art Show held

Aug. 7-11

  • “People’s Choice” online voting

Aug. 14th (week of)

  • Judges select UT Southwestern winners

Aug. 24

  • Reception at the Faculty Club to announce the winners
    4:30-5:30 p.m., Florence Building (E4), South Campus, fourth floor

Prices change for Interlibrary Loan on July 1

Beginning July 1, 2017, all affiliated clients will be charged for all Interlibrary Loan requests. This change, which was recommended by the Library Advisory Committee and supported by the Dean’s Office, will mark the first time that the UT Southwestern Library has ever charged students, residents, and fellows for regularly delivered materials.

The pricing model will look like this:

Delivery Speed Cost per Item
*(Affiliated)
Cost per Item
**(Not Affiliated)
Regular
(2-10 Days)
$5.00 $13.00
Rush
(By the end of next business day)
Not available for book requests
$15.00 $60.00

Please note: We will continue to provide materials – both books and articles listed in our catalog at the Joint Library Facility (JLF) – at no cost for a regular delivery.

This change is being made for two main reasons:

  • Decline in state revenue funding
  • UTSW clients making requests for items to which we already have access

In 2016, approximately one in every three InterLibrary Loan requests were for documents that UTSW clients can currently access.  To remind clients to first look to see if the Library has access to their articles before placing the request, we have recently added links to Ejournals A to Z and related tutorials and PubMed on the ILLiad login page.

Once this policy takes effect, Library staff will cancel article requests that can be obtained through Ejournals A to Z to help save our clients money.

Check out the Library’s updated Nursing Portal!

The Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center provides reliable information resources that nurses can use. The Nursing Portal was updated based on recommendations and suggestions provided by UTSW nurses and is designed to assist nurses in identifying, accessing, and utilizing Library resources to support patient care, quality improvement, research, policies, and procedures.

Source: Nursing Portal: Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center. Nakashima, C., and Scott, J., 2017.

The Nursing Portal’s resources are organized into seven categories:

  1. Databases – include CINAHL, Clinical Skills, ClinicalKey for Nursing, UpToDate, and more
  2. Electronic Books – search the Library’s collection of more than 1,500 nursing books
  3. Journals – explore the Library’s collection of more than 750 nursing journals
  4. Nursing Resources – check out links to web and Library-subscribed resources
  5. Patient Resources – links to Library-subscribed patient education handouts
  6. Local Nursing School Libraries – links to libraries of local CCNE and ACEN accredited nursing programs
  7. Evidence-Based Practice Portal – provides an overview of EBP for clinicians as well as how to develop a PICO question, use the EBP Pyramid, and find evidence in web and Library-subscribed resources.

Library services for nurses include:

For more information or to schedule training with a health sciences librarian, please visit the Nursing Portal or contact us by completing the Ask Us form or call 214-648-2001.

“We’re on the move!”: Library relocates archive and history materials

St. Paul Hospital on Harry Hines Blvd., babies in incubators being moved into new building (1963)

Like the St. Paul nurses in the photo above, Library staff will soon be moving some precious cargo of our own! The UT Southwestern History of Medicine and Archives Collections are in the process of being shifted to different locations. The archives’ records are currently stored in multiple library locations. This move will result in most of the UT Southwestern Archives being consolidated into one storage space, which will provide easier records processing and reference services. (Quick archival education side note: “Processing” is the arrangement, description, and housing of archival materials for storage and use by patrons.) Additionally, a local area is being renovated for other materials.

In preparation for the move, Library staff have been re-housing archives materials into acid-free folders and placing these folders in acid-free boxes. It is general practice in archives to house unbound documents in acid-free, lignin-free, buffered file folders, which are then stored in chemically-stable document storage boxes. These improvements are important steps toward ensuring a better preservation environment for the thousands of records that document the institutional history of UT Southwestern.

During the move, reference services for the archives will be temporarily placed on hold. While our physical archives are moving, don’t forget about the access you have to the archives via various online resources.

  • Our UT Southwestern Image Archives collection has over 700 photos documenting the history of UT Southwestern and 300 photos detailing Dallas’ medical history.
  • The UT Southwestern Institutional Repository is an amazing source of information for accessing some Medical Student Research Forum posters and other student publications, historical UT Southwestern documents, Grand Rounds materials, and much more!

Other activities requiring the archives may also be suspended or delayed; we will keep you updated via social media and through the Library News blog. Stay tuned, however, for we will be holding an archives grand “re”-opening for UT Southwestern faculty, researchers, students, and staff once the move is completed.

Questions? Contact the archives at archives@utsouthwestern.edu.

Library launches new Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Portal

Where do I look for the best evidence to answer a clinical question? 

The Library is excited to launch a new portal, Evidence-Based Practice (EBP)!

With an estimated 2,000 new articles indexed daily in PubMed, finding evidence-based answers can be overwhelming. Even knowing where to start searching the Library’s numerous subscribed resources and key websites can be daunting!

To assist and streamline searching this portal, the Library’s resources are organized in the EBP Pyramid’s three categories:

  1. Filtered/pre-appraised resources appraise the quality of studies, often making recommendations for practice and to save time (i.e., Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, UpToDate, National Guideline Clearinghouse).
  2. Unfiltered/unappraised resources are the databases of original studies (i.e., MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase).
  3. Background information/resources link to select textbooks.

Note: The new Evidence-Based Portal replaces the existing Clinical Evidence Portal, which will be sunsetted at the end of March; please update your bookmarks accordingly.

For more information on EBP, click on the Portal’s horizontal tabs or links listed in the left sidebar of the Portal’s home page. Questions? Please complete the Ask Us form or call 214-648-2001.

Coming in April – Key Class Series!

Attend any or all of the “Key Classes” of our most frequently requested topics! Classes are free, hands-on, and open to all faculty, students, clinicians, and staff of UT Southwestern Medical Center and the University Hospitals. Don’t delay: register now in Taleo Learn, but be advised that seating is limited!

For more information on the “Key Classes” or other training/class topics, please email LibAsk@utsouthwestern.edu or call 214-648-2001.

Class Title: Expert Database Searching
Location: Clements University Hospital, Conference Room 3.512
Date: April 4, 2017
Time: 10 a.m. – noon

Locate electronic full-text articles using the Library’s wide range of databases, including Ovid MEDLINE®, Embase®, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus. Learn how to utilize Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and keywords to narrow your search to locate exactly what you’re looking for. Each database has its own unique way to search effectively and one method does not fit all. You are welcome to bring your laptop computer.

Class Title: EndNote X8 Citation Management
Location: Clements University Hospital, Conference Room 6.422
Date: April 11, 2017
Time: 10 a.m. – noon

How much time do you spend on your reference section? This key class will include:

  • Creating and organizing an EndNote library
  • Adding references to a library both manually and by using direct export or filters
  • Using the “Group” function to organize references
  • Inserting and editing citations in a Word document using EndNote’s Cite While You Write (CWYW) function
  • Formatting references in different reference or output styles

For personal assistance with your EndNote library, please bring your laptop computer.

Class Title: Evidence-Based Practice
Location: Clements University Hospital, Conference Room 6.314
Date: April 18, 2017
Time: 10 a.m. – noon

Evidence-based practice is an approach to clinical practice that revolves around the use of the best available clinical evidence when making treatment decisions about individual patients. One of the biggest challenges of evidence-based practice is locating and identifying the best available clinical evidence, and determining which resources to use when gathering evidence. This class will introduce the number of systems developed for the identification of best evidence resources for clinical evaluation. You are welcome to bring your laptop computer.

Class Title: Introduction to Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis
Location: Clements University Hospital, Conference Room 6.314
Date: April 25, 2017
Time: 10 a.m. – noon

This class will review methods used by those performing systematic reviews and meta-analysis, including building a team and formulating a research question and hypothesis, as well as methods for searching the literature, abstracting information, and synthesizing the evidence both qualitatively and quantitatively. We will also cover how to formulate an answerable research question; define inclusion and exclusion criteria; search for the evidence; extract data; assess the risk of bias in the underlying studies; perform qualitative synthesis, meta-analysis, and sensitivity analysis; and assess meta-bias. You are welcome to bring your laptop computer.

2017 Medical Student Research Forum posters now available online

Posters presented at the 55th Annual UT Southwestern Medical Student Research Forum are now available through the UT Southwestern Institutional Repository’s Annual Medical Student Research Forum Collection, along with a booklet containing information on all posters.

Beginning in 1962, the UT Southwestern Medical Student Research Forum is an annual event celebrating research conducted by UT Southwestern medical students. The event is open to any medical student who participated in research, whether through the Summer Research Program or a yearlong program like HHMI.

For the last four years, presentation posters have been submitted to the Institutional Repository collection. Each publicly-available poster in the collection includes additional descriptive information, as well as a citation formatted according to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, which can be used with CVs or in various applications.

For questions about contributing content in general to the UT Southwestern Institutional Repository, contact Cameron Kainerstorfer at archives@utsouthwestern.edu.

The Sage Premier 2017 journals collection has arrived!

As a member of The University of Texas System Digital Library (UTSDL) consortia, the UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center now has online access to the 2017 Sage Premier Collection of online scholarly journals.

Sage Premier provides online access to more than 900 peer-reviewed, full-text journals, including high-impact research titles published on behalf of nearly 300 scholarly and professional societies. The collection offers broad interdisciplinary coverage of a wide range of subject areas, including business, humanities, social science, science, technology, and medicine.

Library’s Systematic Review Service officially launches

Are you preparing for a “systematic review”? Systematic reviews aim to identify and synthesize all of the scholarly research – including both published and unpublished studies – on a particular topic. They are conducted in an unbiased, reproducible way to (1) provide evidence for practice and policy-making and (2) identify gaps in research. If you’re not sure that a systematic review is the right type of literature review for you or you would like to learn more about systematic reviews, see our Systematic Review Portal.

The UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center offers a systematic review service to faculty, post-doctoral and graduate students, and research staff. For an overview of the systematic review process, the Library offers training on the following topics:

  • Overview of the process
  • Systematic review standards (IOM, PRISMA, Cochrane)
  • EndNote
  • Characteristics of a systematic review
  • Development of the research question
  • Potential databases for searching
  • Strategy development
  • Grey literature

Librarians are experts in the field of research and provide in-class instruction on systematic review methodology. To request an instruction session or workshop, fill out the Ask Us Form and indicate your interest in systematic reviews.

Beginning FY 2017, there is a fee for a librarian’s contribution to a systematic review. Librarians are included as authors on systematic review publications based on their valuable contributions to the review, including:

  • Identifying relevant databases and other sources for searching the scholarly literature, including grey literature.
  • Designing and implementing complex, database-specific search strategies.
  • Using reference management software and other tools for managing the study gathering and selection process.
  • Creating search alerts to ensure that new studies are found while the review is in progress.
  • Guidance on the systematic review process and protocol development.
  • Translating the protocol across multiple databases.
  • Conducting and documenting the search in multiple databases.
  • Providing protocol and results from all databases
  • Finding and evaluating systematic reviews that have already been published.
  • Delivering citations in preferred citation management software (e.g., EndNote).
  • Providing basic guidance on screening process (overview of Covidence or DistillerSR, if selected for purchase).
  • Writing methods section.

According to Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews, which was published in 2011 by the Institute of Medicine, the systematic review team should “[work] with a librarian or other information specialist trained in performing systematic reviews to plan the search strategy” (p. 266). Your UTSW librarians are happy to partner with you as you begin this considerable process. If you have any questions about this service, please email us at LibAsk@utsouthwestern.edu.

“National Clean Off Your Desk Day” + “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” + records management = fun!

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M.,

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M., “Cluttered desk at the historic Harrison Brothers Hardware Store, Huntsville, Alabama,” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.16835

I know what you’re thinking…how could the combination of cleaning off your desk, cleaning out your inbox, and managing records be fun? Well, I’m here to tell you!

Spring cleaning is not just for straightening up your house – it can be for the office, too! And it doesn’t have to be done in the spring! The month of January is a busy month where “spring” cleaning of your office records are concerned.

January 9, 2017, is National Clean Off Your Desk Day, and January 23-27, 2017, is National Clean Out Your Inbox Week. Now, you may think these days are solely about being able to see the surface of your desk again and not having thousands of emails bulking up your Outlook account. However, they also provide a wonderful opportunity for records management and archives professionals to talk about the importance of managing records and archives.

What is “records management”? The Society of American Archivists defines it in its glossary as “the systematic and administrative control of records throughout their life cycle to ensure efficiency and economy in their creation, use, handling, control, maintenance, and disposition.” All records have a life cycle that ends with either the record’s destruction or the record’s transfer to an institutional archives.

Records management can be overwhelming. Thankfully, UT Southwestern’s Materials Management Department, who manage administrative records retention on campus, has some helpful resources to which we can refer. The Open Drawer newsletter provides essential information about how to manage your UT Southwestern administrative records, including email. The June 2015 issue is especially relevant to this month’s “National Clean Off Your Desk Day”, as it provides useful hints on how to analyze the records you have to help you dispose of them and organize them into a filing system that allows you to efficiently and effectively locate records. As the newsletter notes: “Regularly decluttering unnecessary papers will pay off in time savings the next time you are searching for a document.”

April 2015’s Open Drawer speaks right to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” as the entire issue is dedicated to email management. UT Southwestern employees will also find that reviewing the resources linked from the Records Retention webpage on the Intranet and the Records Retention Schedule will be helpful in guiding them to make decision about the records they have created and how long they need to be retained.

Regarding email management, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s The Texas Record blog has several posts UT Southwestern employees may find informative at the following link: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/slrm/blog/tag/email/. One post of especial relevance to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” is the FAQ on how to set up an email filing system. And no blog post discussing records management would be complete without a records management comic:

recordsmanagementgetsautomated1-colour-32

Credit: Lappin, James, “Automated Records Management,” Thinking Records blog, https://thinkingrecords.co.uk/2013/09/24/automated-records-management/

So what does all this talk about managing the records on your physical and virtual desktop have to do with archives, you ask? Isn’t this just records management, plain and simple? Well, that is the magic of records management – it is uniquely tied to the goals of archives management! An effective records management program results in an effective archives management program because you have ensured that records of temporary value are disposed of when their designated retention period ends while records of permanent, historical value to the university are preserved and maintained so that they may be accessed far into the future. This is why records retention schedules are so important and abiding by them cannot be stressed enough: they are the roadmap that ensures that temporary records are destroyed when needed while permanent records are transferred and preserved in the archives. Ensuring that the records of long-term, historical value are maintained in an institution’s archives is a necessary component to that institution being able to tell its story to future generations.

Need more help getting advice about clearing your desk off? For records management related questions, you can find contact information on the Intranet’s Records Retention page. Curious to learn more about UT Southwestern’s archives? Email us at archives@southwestern.edu.