“National Clean Off Your Desk Day” + “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” + records management = fun!

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M.,

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M., “Cluttered desk at the historic Harrison Brothers Hardware Store, Huntsville, Alabama,” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.16835

I know what you’re thinking…how could the combination of cleaning off your desk, cleaning out your inbox, and managing records be fun? Well, I’m here to tell you!

Spring cleaning is not just for straightening up your house – it can be for the office, too! And it doesn’t have to be done in the spring! The month of January is a busy month where “spring” cleaning of your office records are concerned.

January 9, 2017, is National Clean Off Your Desk Day, and January 23-27, 2017, is National Clean Out Your Inbox Week. Now, you may think these days are solely about being able to see the surface of your desk again and not having thousands of emails bulking up your Outlook account. However, they also provide a wonderful opportunity for records management and archives professionals to talk about the importance of managing records and archives.

What is “records management”? The Society of American Archivists defines it in its glossary as “the systematic and administrative control of records throughout their life cycle to ensure efficiency and economy in their creation, use, handling, control, maintenance, and disposition.” All records have a life cycle that ends with either the record’s destruction or the record’s transfer to an institutional archives.

Records management can be overwhelming. Thankfully, UT Southwestern’s Materials Management Department, who manage administrative records retention on campus, has some helpful resources to which we can refer. The Open Drawer newsletter provides essential information about how to manage your UT Southwestern administrative records, including email. The June 2015 issue is especially relevant to this month’s “National Clean Off Your Desk Day”, as it provides useful hints on how to analyze the records you have to help you dispose of them and organize them into a filing system that allows you to efficiently and effectively locate records. As the newsletter notes: “Regularly decluttering unnecessary papers will pay off in time savings the next time you are searching for a document.”

April 2015’s Open Drawer speaks right to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” as the entire issue is dedicated to email management. UT Southwestern employees will also find that reviewing the resources linked from the Records Retention webpage on the Intranet and the Records Retention Schedule will be helpful in guiding them to make decision about the records they have created and how long they need to be retained.

Regarding email management, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s The Texas Record blog has several posts UT Southwestern employees may find informative at the following link: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/slrm/blog/tag/email/. One post of especial relevance to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” is the FAQ on how to set up an email filing system. And no blog post discussing records management would be complete without a records management comic:

recordsmanagementgetsautomated1-colour-32

Credit: Lappin, James, “Automated Records Management,” Thinking Records blog, https://thinkingrecords.co.uk/2013/09/24/automated-records-management/

So what does all this talk about managing the records on your physical and virtual desktop have to do with archives, you ask? Isn’t this just records management, plain and simple? Well, that is the magic of records management – it is uniquely tied to the goals of archives management! An effective records management program results in an effective archives management program because you have ensured that records of temporary value are disposed of when their designated retention period ends while records of permanent, historical value to the university are preserved and maintained so that they may be accessed far into the future. This is why records retention schedules are so important and abiding by them cannot be stressed enough: they are the roadmap that ensures that temporary records are destroyed when needed while permanent records are transferred and preserved in the archives. Ensuring that the records of long-term, historical value are maintained in an institution’s archives is a necessary component to that institution being able to tell its story to future generations.

Need more help getting advice about clearing your desk off? For records management related questions, you can find contact information on the Intranet’s Records Retention page. Curious to learn more about UT Southwestern’s archives? Email us at archives@southwestern.edu.

New year brings new skills!

aceIs learning a new skill on your list of New Year’s resolutions? Do you want to get organized, reduce stress, or manage time differently in 2017? The UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library & Learning Center can help with that!

More than 22,000 training books and modules housed in the Academy of Career Enhancement’s Books 24×7 collection are available through the Library catalog and includes a variety of topics including project management, time management, work-life balance, stress reduction, and organizational effectiveness. By using the Library catalog to access the entire Books 24×7 collection, you may dive further into a particular topic via the sidebar. Once you locate an item of interest, simply click on the online access link and use your campus log-in to continue. You can quickly jump to particular chapters, take notes, create bookmarks, and more.

This collection – part of the Academy of Career Enhancement (ACE) – is provided to the UT Southwestern community through an enterprise license of online resources for the continuing development and engagement of the UT Southwestern workforce. The multi-year contract is funded by several campus departments, including the Office of Human Resources.

The Librarian is in! New in-person Library research support available in 2017

the-librarian-is-in-1Need help with EndNote citation management? Researching a topic? Using one of the many library database resources? David Rathvon, the UT Southwestern Health Science Digital Library & Learning Center’s Client Experience Program Coordinator, will be available to provide in-person research assistance at the North and South Campus Library locations.

David will be at the North Campus Library on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. and at the South Campus Library on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 10 a.m. and 12 noon.

Introducing CiteScore: a new standard for measuring your impact in Scopus

7904846012_2e76778e68_bCiteScore™ metrics are a new standard to measure citation impact. Comprehensive, transparent, current, and free, CiteScore metrics help you to analyze the impact of all serial titles – including journals – at all levels – journal, article, and author – in Scopus, a scientific citation database provided by the UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center.

Journal Metrics

  • CiteScore metrics: A family of eight indicators that offers complementary views to analyze the publication influence of serial titles of interest. Derived from the Scopus database – almost twice the size of the next-leading abstract and citation data provider – CiteScore™ metrics offer a more robust and accurate indication of a serial’s impact.
  • SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): A prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. With SJR, the subject field, quality, and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation.
  • Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): Measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. The impact of a single citation is given higher value in subject areas where citations are less likely, and vice versa.

Additionally, you can compare total number of citations received per year, total number of documents published per year, the percentage of documents each year that have never been cited, and the percentage of documents published in the year that are review articles.

Article-level Metrics

Article-level metrics (ALMs) quantify the reach and impact of published research. Scopus incorporates data from new sources (such as social media mentions) along with traditional measures (such as citations) to present a richer picture of an individual article’s impact.

The Article Metrics module on Scopus combines citation and alternative metrics in a new way to help you benchmark articles better. Use it to both determine which articles to read, and to gain deep insights into how an article compares with similar articles. On the Scopus article page, a sidebar highlights the minimal number of meaningful metrics a researcher needs, including (as available):

  • Citation count and percentile benchmark
  • Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI)
  • Count of one type of scholarly commentary (e.g., blog posts, Wikipedia)
  • Count and benchmark of one type of social activity (e.g., Twitter, Facebook)
  • Total count of additional metrics and link to see breakdown by source

From the sidebar, clicking <View all metrics> opens the full Article Metrics module, providing an overview of all available metrics and the underlying content for further analysis and understanding.

Author Metrics

Scopus bibliometrics can help you assess an individual author’s research output and scholarly impact. The depth and breadth of content on Scopus – which includes 2.5 million pre-1996 records – provides the quality data needed to build accurate measurements of an author’s impact. With Scopus you can easily analyze and track an individual’s citation history. In addition to finding an author’s total citation and document counts from an author’s details page, you can also access the following metrics and tools:

  • h-index and h-graph: Rates a scientist’s performance based on his or her career publications, as measured by the lifetime number of citations each article receives. The measurement depends on both quantity (number of publications) and quality (number of citations) of an academic’s publications.
  • Citation overview tracker: An adjustable table that includes the number of times each document has been cited per publication year.
  • Analyze author output: A collection of in-depth and visual analysis tools designed to provide a better picture of an individual’s publication history and influence.

For more information about Library resources or to schedule a one-on-one training, please contact your health science librarian by email or use the Ask Us form on the Library’s website.

To schedule an individual or group training session, please use the Request Training page.

December Library Toy Drive to benefit Dallas County children

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Brother Bill’s Helping Hand needs gifts for their annual Children’s Christmas Celebration for the children of Dallas County, and the UT Southwestern Library is providing a drop-off location for gifts at all Library locations from December 1-16, 2016.

If you would like to participate, please bring a new, unwrapped toy to the South Campus Library (E2.200), North Campus Library (ND2.300), or the Bass Building (BL5.500) by December 16. Alternatively, you may purchase toys from their Target online registry; items purchased online will ship directly to them.

All toys should be less than $12.00. Suggested items are listed below:

  • Coloring Books & Crayon Sets (ages 3-5)
  • Matchbox & Hot Wheels (ages 3-5)
  • 4-piece PlayDoh sets (ages 3-5)
  • Board Games (ages 6-8)
  • Lego Sets (ages 6-8)
  • 6″ puzzles (ages 6-8)
  • Jenga Game (ages 9-11)
  • Nerf Footballs (ages 12-14)

If you need more information, please call 214-648-2001.

St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity Exhibit at South Campus Library

stpaulThe UT Southwestern Medical Center Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center is proud to present an exhibit highlighting the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The selected images, which will be on display through January 2017 at the South Campus Library, were originally displayed in one of the conference rooms at St. Paul Hospital.

The Library has an extensive collection of archival materials documenting the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The collection was transferred to the Library in 2008 and includes newsletters, pamphlets, departmental files, newspaper clippings, patient registers from the hospital’s founding, photographs, and more. Materials about the St. Paul Nursing School, which operated from 1900 to 1970, are also part of this archival collection.

Visit the online UT Southwestern Image Archives to view over 200 images that document the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The collection is also available for research and educational purposes. Contact archives@utsouthwestern.edu to schedule an appointment.

EndNote X8 is here! Upgrade now available for download for Mac and PC

cw1x7zrveaauraqThe new EndNote X8 software is now available for install from the UT Southwestern Information Resources EndNote software support page. This upgrade has been anticipated for many Mac users with Sierra who have experienced downloading issues of X7.

An EndNote comparison chart of X8, X7, and X6 versions provides a comprehensive list of existing features along with new X8 additions that include:

  • Sharing functions including a large increase in shared libraries
  • Activity Feed with Shared Library member activity 
  • Learn when new members join the Shared Library
  • Automation and full text management including Recently Added Group
  • Automatically find and apply bulk reference updates
  • Unified iconography across both Mac and Windows.

More information, resources, and news about EndNote can be found at the Library and Learning Center’s EndNote Portal. If you have a specific EndNote question, contact our EndNote experts by email or Ask Us form on the Library & Learning Center’s website. To schedule an individual or group training session, use the Request Training page.

Color, share, and celebrate Picture Book Month in November!

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An 1835 illustration featured in the National Library of Medicine’s #ColorOurCollections Coloring Book.

Art Therapy, Adult Coloring Books and Your Mental Health

According to the American Art Therapy Association, art therapy is a mental health profession in which the process of making and creating artwork is used to “explore feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety and increase self-esteem.”

The Health Benefits of Adult Coloring Books

Despite the fact that coloring and art therapy aren’t quite the same thing, coloring does offer a slew of mental benefits. Coloring definitely has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety, create focus, or bring [about] more mindfulness. Groundbreaking research in 2005 proved anxiety levels dropped when subjects colored mandalas, which are round frames with geometric patterns inside. Simply doodling, though, had no effect in reducing the other subjects’ stress levels.

Just like meditation, coloring also allows us to switch off our brains from other thoughts and focus only on the moment, helping to alleviate free-floating anxiety. It can be particularly effective for people who aren’t comfortable with more creatively expressive forms of art. Now get coloring!

The South and North Campus Branch Libraries will have coloring stations with crayons and pages of science and medical related material for you to enjoy this month.

Download these free science and medical-related coloring books featured at the Library coloring tables this month:

Follow the Library’s Facebook or Twitter page for a daily page to color from these collections.

Rare Book Room Open House: October Spotlight—History of the Nobel Prizes

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The Health Sciences Digital Library & Learning Center invites you to attend our next open house event entitled “October Spotlight—History of the Nobel Prizes”. This event, which is open to the UT Southwestern community*, will be held in the Library’s Rare Book Room (E3.314D) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on two different days to accommodate a wider variety of visitors:

  • Tuesday, October 25
  • Friday, October 28

Featured material from the Library’s special collections and archives will be on display, including photographs, documents, books, and other items highlighting discoveries in science and medicine with connections to the Nobel Prizes since they were founded.

For more information, email archives@utsouthwestern.edu.

*The South Campus (main) Library requires a UT Southwestern ID badge for entry.