“National Clean Off Your Desk Day” + “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” + records management = fun!

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M.,

Credit: Highsmith, Carol M., “Cluttered desk at the historic Harrison Brothers Hardware Store, Huntsville, Alabama,” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.16835

I know what you’re thinking…how could the combination of cleaning off your desk, cleaning out your inbox, and managing records be fun? Well, I’m here to tell you!

Spring cleaning is not just for straightening up your house – it can be for the office, too! And it doesn’t have to be done in the spring! The month of January is a busy month where “spring” cleaning of your office records are concerned.

January 9, 2017, is National Clean Off Your Desk Day, and January 23-27, 2017, is National Clean Out Your Inbox Week. Now, you may think these days are solely about being able to see the surface of your desk again and not having thousands of emails bulking up your Outlook account. However, they also provide a wonderful opportunity for records management and archives professionals to talk about the importance of managing records and archives.

What is “records management”? The Society of American Archivists defines it in its glossary as “the systematic and administrative control of records throughout their life cycle to ensure efficiency and economy in their creation, use, handling, control, maintenance, and disposition.” All records have a life cycle that ends with either the record’s destruction or the record’s transfer to an institutional archives.

Records management can be overwhelming. Thankfully, UT Southwestern’s Materials Management Department, who manage administrative records retention on campus, has some helpful resources to which we can refer. The Open Drawer newsletter provides essential information about how to manage your UT Southwestern administrative records, including email. The June 2015 issue is especially relevant to this month’s “National Clean Off Your Desk Day”, as it provides useful hints on how to analyze the records you have to help you dispose of them and organize them into a filing system that allows you to efficiently and effectively locate records. As the newsletter notes: “Regularly decluttering unnecessary papers will pay off in time savings the next time you are searching for a document.”

April 2015’s Open Drawer speaks right to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” as the entire issue is dedicated to email management. UT Southwestern employees will also find that reviewing the resources linked from the Records Retention webpage on the Intranet and the Records Retention Schedule will be helpful in guiding them to make decision about the records they have created and how long they need to be retained.

Regarding email management, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s The Texas Record blog has several posts UT Southwestern employees may find informative at the following link: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/slrm/blog/tag/email/. One post of especial relevance to “National Clean Out Your Inbox Week” is the FAQ on how to set up an email filing system. And no blog post discussing records management would be complete without a records management comic:

recordsmanagementgetsautomated1-colour-32

Credit: Lappin, James, “Automated Records Management,” Thinking Records blog, https://thinkingrecords.co.uk/2013/09/24/automated-records-management/

So what does all this talk about managing the records on your physical and virtual desktop have to do with archives, you ask? Isn’t this just records management, plain and simple? Well, that is the magic of records management – it is uniquely tied to the goals of archives management! An effective records management program results in an effective archives management program because you have ensured that records of temporary value are disposed of when their designated retention period ends while records of permanent, historical value to the university are preserved and maintained so that they may be accessed far into the future. This is why records retention schedules are so important and abiding by them cannot be stressed enough: they are the roadmap that ensures that temporary records are destroyed when needed while permanent records are transferred and preserved in the archives. Ensuring that the records of long-term, historical value are maintained in an institution’s archives is a necessary component to that institution being able to tell its story to future generations.

Need more help getting advice about clearing your desk off? For records management related questions, you can find contact information on the Intranet’s Records Retention page. Curious to learn more about UT Southwestern’s archives? Email us at archives@southwestern.edu.

New year brings new skills!

aceIs learning a new skill on your list of New Year’s resolutions? Do you want to get organized, reduce stress, or manage time differently in 2017? The UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library & Learning Center can help with that!

More than 22,000 training books and modules housed in the Academy of Career Enhancement’s Books 24×7 collection are available through the Library catalog and includes a variety of topics including project management, time management, work-life balance, stress reduction, and organizational effectiveness. By using the Library catalog to access the entire Books 24×7 collection, you may dive further into a particular topic via the sidebar. Once you locate an item of interest, simply click on the online access link and use your campus log-in to continue. You can quickly jump to particular chapters, take notes, create bookmarks, and more.

This collection – part of the Academy of Career Enhancement (ACE) – is provided to the UT Southwestern community through an enterprise license of online resources for the continuing development and engagement of the UT Southwestern workforce. The multi-year contract is funded by several campus departments, including the Office of Human Resources.

Library’s web server to be replaced, back-up site available

websiteconstructThe Library’s Digital Services and Technology Planning unit will be transferring our website to a new web server starting Friday, September 9, 2016. During this time, we will have our back-up site available.

Please notify LibWebmaster@utsouthwestern.edu if you experience any issues with access to Library resources during this time.

"Download limits": what you need to know about licensing agreements

Note: Survey is no longer active.

The UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center provides access to many electronic resources (e.g., databases, electronic journals, etc.), and the use of these resources is governed by license agreements with vendors or publishers. Systematic or excessive downloading from an electronic resource is explicitly prohibited and may result in loss of our institutional access.

EZproxy has built-in restrictions to prevent the systematic harvesting of content by robots or other spoof mechanisms. The download limit is 100 megabytes (MB) within a 15-minute period of time. This limit could possibly be hit during normal downloading of content, so it does not necessarily suggest any illicit action on the user’s part.  When the download limit is exceeded, the user’s account is suspended for two hours, and the following message displays:

Our Library resource vendors have stipulations for the amount of content that can be downloaded by a user within a certain time period. Unfortunately, you have exceeded your download limit of 100 MB within a 15 minute time frame. Your suspension will expire in 2 hours. If you frequently receive this message, please contact the Library at Liberesources@utsouthwestern.eduWe apologize for any inconvenience.

An investigation is currently underway to assure that we prevent abuse of Library resources while minimizing any disruption of authorized usage. If you have experienced this download limit message, please fill out this brief Survey Monkey questionnaire about your experience  so we can better troubleshoot the current process.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us by email at Liberesources@utsouthwestern.edu.

Library secures NNLM Emerging Technology award for 3D printer and supplies

Medical Students at 3D printing orientation

Medical Students Thomas Das, Timothy Sotman, May Liu, and Paul Rizk plan to use the 3D printer for an upcoming Biomedical Innovation course.

The Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center was the proud recipient of a National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Chapter 2015 Emerging Technology Award. The purpose of the award is to encourage 3D printing literacy to our campus community through access to a 3D printer and electronic resources, including the NIH 3D Print Exchange. This NIH website provides 3D printed models, tutorials and a learning community discussion board for troubleshooting.

Jane Scott, Co-Manager of the Library’s Digital Services and Technology Planning unit, is spearheading the effort. Assistant VP of Library Services Kelly Gonzalez and Scott co-wrote the winning award. Scott has collaborated with several people across disciplines with specific project needs.

“We are getting a variety of different requests,” Scott says. “I printed a MacBook adaptor cord holder for Information Resources. I am currently assisting a PostDoc with printing a specific labware modification for a beaker found on the NIH site and an additional custom-made item created using TinkerCad, a free online 3D modeling program I introduced him to.”

Creating a model and using the 3D printer can have its challenges. “There is a lot of architecture and engineering concepts to consider when creating a successful 3D print model,” cautions Scott. “Troubleshooting how to best print and with what materials is always key. There are specific heat and fan settings based on the types of filaments used and the extruder can sometimes be temperamental. My goal is to provide information and strategize to minimize these 3D printing challenges.”

3D printing projects are currently being accepted on a case-by-case basis. Plans to move the printer to the 24/7 accessible Digital Media Production Studio in the South Campus Library are in the works along with policies and protocols for usage.

Contact Jane Scott for 3D print inquiries or to schedule an orientation.

This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. HHSN-276-2011-00007-C with the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library.

 

 

Get PsychiatryOnline access anytime, anywhere on your mobile device

psychonlineAPA Publishing (American Psychiatric Association) recently released a mobile solution for PsychiatryOnline, which allows users to “pair” their smartphone or tablet to our institutional subscription. Download PsychiatryOnline’s Mobile Device Pairing Guide for directions on how to pair your mobile device. Once paired, a user can access POL from their mobile device whenever and wherever there is an Internet connection available. Device pairings expire after 90 days, but can be re-paired at that time.

 

Using ORCID to track your research and scholarship path

IDORCID® provides a persistent digital identifier for scholarship and research purposes. This ORCID identifier is integrated into some manuscript or grant submissions, researcher systems (such as SciENcv), institutional repositories, and more. It is easy to register, add your information, and use your ORCID identifer.

To register for an ORCID identifier, go to https://orcid.org/register and do the following:

  • Provide your name, an email address, and a password.
  • Select a default privacy mode for new research activities.

Upon completion of registration, your basic ORCID account, with your ORCID identifier, will be ready for you to use. Here’s an example:

ORCID iDhttp://orcid.org/0000-0003-0190-9518

Once you have created your ORCID account, you can opt to enhance it by completing sections related to education, employment, or funding. Add your academic posters, ETDs, journal articles, or other scholarly publications to the Works section. If you have already published elsewhere, some systems allow you to automatically transfer citations. Some examples include:

  • CrossRef
  • DataCite
  • Europe PubMed Central
  • ISNI
  • ResearcherID
  • Scopus

Don’t forget about the country and name variations in the account sidebar. Adding a country is helpful in distinguishing your work from another researcher with the same name in another country. If your name has changed or you have published using a name variation, providing the different names helps to connect all your research.

How can you use your ORCID identifier?

  • Use it as an identifier link on web pages or in your CV and email signature
  • Provide it when submitting an ETD to the Vireo online submission system
  • Include it when you submit publications for journals or conferences
  • Send it when you deposit publications into the institutional repository
  • Add it to funding activities
  • Share it with another researcher