The Librarian is in! New in-person Library research support available in 2017

the-librarian-is-in-1Need help with EndNote citation management? Researching a topic? Using one of the many library database resources? David Rathvon, the UT Southwestern Health Science Digital Library & Learning Center’s Client Experience Program Coordinator, will be available to provide in-person research assistance at the North and South Campus Library locations.

David will be at the North Campus Library on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. and at the South Campus Library on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 10 a.m. and 12 noon.

Introducing CiteScore: a new standard for measuring your impact in Scopus

7904846012_2e76778e68_bCiteScore™ metrics are a new standard to measure citation impact. Comprehensive, transparent, current, and free, CiteScore metrics help you to analyze the impact of all serial titles – including journals – at all levels – journal, article, and author – in Scopus, a scientific citation database provided by the UT Southwestern Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center.

Journal Metrics

  • CiteScore metrics: A family of eight indicators that offers complementary views to analyze the publication influence of serial titles of interest. Derived from the Scopus database – almost twice the size of the next-leading abstract and citation data provider – CiteScore™ metrics offer a more robust and accurate indication of a serial’s impact.
  • SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): A prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. With SJR, the subject field, quality, and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation.
  • Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): Measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. The impact of a single citation is given higher value in subject areas where citations are less likely, and vice versa.

Additionally, you can compare total number of citations received per year, total number of documents published per year, the percentage of documents each year that have never been cited, and the percentage of documents published in the year that are review articles.

Article-level Metrics

Article-level metrics (ALMs) quantify the reach and impact of published research. Scopus incorporates data from new sources (such as social media mentions) along with traditional measures (such as citations) to present a richer picture of an individual article’s impact.

The Article Metrics module on Scopus combines citation and alternative metrics in a new way to help you benchmark articles better. Use it to both determine which articles to read, and to gain deep insights into how an article compares with similar articles. On the Scopus article page, a sidebar highlights the minimal number of meaningful metrics a researcher needs, including (as available):

  • Citation count and percentile benchmark
  • Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI)
  • Count of one type of scholarly commentary (e.g., blog posts, Wikipedia)
  • Count and benchmark of one type of social activity (e.g., Twitter, Facebook)
  • Total count of additional metrics and link to see breakdown by source

From the sidebar, clicking <View all metrics> opens the full Article Metrics module, providing an overview of all available metrics and the underlying content for further analysis and understanding.

Author Metrics

Scopus bibliometrics can help you assess an individual author’s research output and scholarly impact. The depth and breadth of content on Scopus – which includes 2.5 million pre-1996 records – provides the quality data needed to build accurate measurements of an author’s impact. With Scopus you can easily analyze and track an individual’s citation history. In addition to finding an author’s total citation and document counts from an author’s details page, you can also access the following metrics and tools:

  • h-index and h-graph: Rates a scientist’s performance based on his or her career publications, as measured by the lifetime number of citations each article receives. The measurement depends on both quantity (number of publications) and quality (number of citations) of an academic’s publications.
  • Citation overview tracker: An adjustable table that includes the number of times each document has been cited per publication year.
  • Analyze author output: A collection of in-depth and visual analysis tools designed to provide a better picture of an individual’s publication history and influence.

For more information about Library resources or to schedule a one-on-one training, please contact your health science librarian by email or use the Ask Us form on the Library’s website.

To schedule an individual or group training session, please use the Request Training page.

December Library Toy Drive to benefit Dallas County children

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Brother Bill’s Helping Hand needs gifts for their annual Children’s Christmas Celebration for the children of Dallas County, and the UT Southwestern Library is providing a drop-off location for gifts at all Library locations from December 1-16, 2016.

If you would like to participate, please bring a new, unwrapped toy to the South Campus Library (E2.200), North Campus Library (ND2.300), or the Bass Building (BL5.500) by December 16. Alternatively, you may purchase toys from their Target online registry; items purchased online will ship directly to them.

All toys should be less than $12.00. Suggested items are listed below:

  • Coloring Books & Crayon Sets (ages 3-5)
  • Matchbox & Hot Wheels (ages 3-5)
  • 4-piece PlayDoh sets (ages 3-5)
  • Board Games (ages 6-8)
  • Lego Sets (ages 6-8)
  • 6″ puzzles (ages 6-8)
  • Jenga Game (ages 9-11)
  • Nerf Footballs (ages 12-14)

If you need more information, please call 214-648-2001.

St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity Exhibit at South Campus Library

stpaulThe UT Southwestern Medical Center Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center is proud to present an exhibit highlighting the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The selected images, which will be on display through January 2017 at the South Campus Library, were originally displayed in one of the conference rooms at St. Paul Hospital.

The Library has an extensive collection of archival materials documenting the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The collection was transferred to the Library in 2008 and includes newsletters, pamphlets, departmental files, newspaper clippings, patient registers from the hospital’s founding, photographs, and more. Materials about the St. Paul Nursing School, which operated from 1900 to 1970, are also part of this archival collection.

Visit the online UT Southwestern Image Archives to view over 200 images that document the history of St. Paul Hospital and the Daughters of Charity. The collection is also available for research and educational purposes. Contact archives@utsouthwestern.edu to schedule an appointment.

EndNote X8 is here! Upgrade now available for download for Mac and PC

cw1x7zrveaauraqThe new EndNote X8 software is now available for install from the UT Southwestern Information Resources EndNote software support page. This upgrade has been anticipated for many Mac users with Sierra who have experienced downloading issues of X7.

An EndNote comparison chart of X8, X7, and X6 versions provides a comprehensive list of existing features along with new X8 additions that include:

  • Sharing functions including a large increase in shared libraries
  • Activity Feed with Shared Library member activity 
  • Learn when new members join the Shared Library
  • Automation and full text management including Recently Added Group
  • Automatically find and apply bulk reference updates
  • Unified iconography across both Mac and Windows.

More information, resources, and news about EndNote can be found at the Library and Learning Center’s EndNote Portal. If you have a specific EndNote question, contact our EndNote experts by email or Ask Us form on the Library & Learning Center’s website. To schedule an individual or group training session, use the Request Training page.

Color, share, and celebrate Picture Book Month in November!

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An 1835 illustration featured in the National Library of Medicine’s #ColorOurCollections Coloring Book.

Art Therapy, Adult Coloring Books and Your Mental Health

According to the American Art Therapy Association, art therapy is a mental health profession in which the process of making and creating artwork is used to “explore feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety and increase self-esteem.”

The Health Benefits of Adult Coloring Books

Despite the fact that coloring and art therapy aren’t quite the same thing, coloring does offer a slew of mental benefits. Coloring definitely has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety, create focus, or bring [about] more mindfulness. Groundbreaking research in 2005 proved anxiety levels dropped when subjects colored mandalas, which are round frames with geometric patterns inside. Simply doodling, though, had no effect in reducing the other subjects’ stress levels.

Just like meditation, coloring also allows us to switch off our brains from other thoughts and focus only on the moment, helping to alleviate free-floating anxiety. It can be particularly effective for people who aren’t comfortable with more creatively expressive forms of art. Now get coloring!

The South and North Campus Branch Libraries will have coloring stations with crayons and pages of science and medical related material for you to enjoy this month.

Download these free science and medical-related coloring books featured at the Library coloring tables this month:

Follow the Library’s Facebook or Twitter page for a daily page to color from these collections.

Rare Book Room Open House: October Spotlight—History of the Nobel Prizes

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The Health Sciences Digital Library & Learning Center invites you to attend our next open house event entitled “October Spotlight—History of the Nobel Prizes”. This event, which is open to the UT Southwestern community*, will be held in the Library’s Rare Book Room (E3.314D) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on two different days to accommodate a wider variety of visitors:

  • Tuesday, October 25
  • Friday, October 28

Featured material from the Library’s special collections and archives will be on display, including photographs, documents, books, and other items highlighting discoveries in science and medicine with connections to the Nobel Prizes since they were founded.

For more information, email archives@utsouthwestern.edu.

*The South Campus (main) Library requires a UT Southwestern ID badge for entry.

STAT!Ref’s BoardVitals provides USMLE 1/2/3 customized exam preparation

usmleboardvitalsNeed to practice for your board exams? Consider using BoardVitals, an effective and powerful board review tool that includes high-quality review questions. The UT Southwestern Library provides access to this resource through our recent subscription to STAT!Ref, which is available through TexShare’s TexSelect Program.

With BoardVitals, users may prepare for a variety of board examinations, including the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1, Step 2 (CK and CS), and Step 3 and the National Council Licensure Examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN). The resource allows for decreased study time, with everything organized under one platform and the best questions to study listed up front.

Users will need to register for a new account by going to BoardVitals.com and using the @utsouthwestern.edu email address as their username. Once the account is set up, users may create customized practice tests using many options including number or questions, subjects and more.

Also included are detailed, up-to-date explanations with each answer, with references and links to applicable sources. BoardVitals contains the very best questions brought together from the leading medical publishers, research institutions, and practicing clinicians.

If you have any questions or need more information, please send an email or call 214-648-2001.

What do archivists do? Find out October 5th with #AskAnArchivist Day on Twitter!

cathy-miller-75Post written by Digital Archivist, Cathy Miller, MAS, CA

What comes to mind when you hear the word “archives”? If your first thoughts were “dust, old stuff, attics, or basements”, then this is an exciting opportunity to introduce to you what archives are and what archivists do. Contrary to movie depictions, being an archivist is not about stealing the Declaration of Independence and going on a treasure hunt. Make no mistake: treasures can be found in an archive; however, the roadmap to said treasures is not written in invisible ink on the back of an important historical document!

The first question that may come to your mind is, “what is an archive?” Archives are records created by a person, family, or organization (either public or private) that document the conduct of their affairs and are preserved for both the enduring value of the information they contain and the evidence they provide of the functions and responsibilities of their creator. In laymen’s terms, archives are those records which have been deemed to be of historically valuable importance and are duly preserved.

So, now that we know archives maintain historically valuable records, the question is, “what about UT Southwestern’s archives?” The UT Southwestern archives collect, preserve, and make accessible historical materials documenting UT Southwestern and its predecessor institutions, the university hospitals, careers of notable campus individuals, and Parkland Memorial Hospital. Highlights from our archives include Dr. Alfred G. Gilman’s collection and the Parkland Hospital Collection.

The question remains: “what do I do as the digital archivist here on campus?” Well, it’s my job to appraise, select, describe, preserve, and provide access to historically valuable records about UT Southwestern. And as you may note from my job title, archives aren’t just for old paper records. Archivists have been working on the issues inherent in acquiring, preserving, and providing access to born-digital records for at least 30 years.

Curious to learn more about the UT Southwestern archives and about the work that archivists do? Get your questions ready for #AskAnArchivist day on October 5! I’ll be available at UT Southwestern Library’s Twitter handle (@utswlibrary) to answer your questions. Have you been wondering how to manage your digital files? Worried about digital obsolescence? Curious about digital preservation? Questioning how to preserve your grandmother’s scrapbook? Puzzling over creating appropriate file naming conventions? These are all topics I am excited to talk about with you, and I would love to hear questions from you!